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Information for Mariners

You need port data - here's why...

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With ports, terminals and harbours playing a key role in the shipment of goods and commodities around the globe, access to the latest port information is essential for shipping companies when planning and executing a port call, and enabling safe and efficient access to marine facilities.
 
Critically, not every port has the same facilities available to visiting vessels. Different operating procedures and legal requirements, cargo equipment and berth size, makes each port unique, necessitating that the ship’s bridge team be suitably informed prior to arrival, in order to safely and efficiently visit a port. 

Understanding tanker ports

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with FindaportCD:Tanker


Tanker vessels (including gas carriers, crude oil carriers, product tankers, chemical tankers) carry a range of liquid bulk cargoes including crude oil, petroleum products, liquefied gas, chemicals, vegetable oils, molasses, fresh water and wine.

Why do I need port information?

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With ports, terminals and harbours playing a key role in the shipment of goods around the globe, access to the latest port information is essential in planning and executing a port call, and enabling safe and efficient access to marine facilities.

MARPOL Explained

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The International Convention for the Prevention of Pollution from Ships, or MARPOL for short, is the main international convention covering prevention of pollution of the marine environment by ships from operational or accidental causes.
 
This international convention was adopted by the International Maritime Organization (IMO) in 1973, and later updated in 1978 after several severe tanker accidents. The combined instrument (MARPOL 73/78) entered into force on 2 October 1983.

Vessel Types Explained

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Modern seagoing commercial vessels come in all shapes and sizes and are designed to carry a wide variety of cargoes. This article will attempt to provide a brief overview of the main types that are plying the oceans today and give some history as to how each design has evolved.

Load Lines Explained

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International Load Line Zones and Areas
During the 19th century, when British trade with the rest of world was growing rapidly, the high loss of ships being experienced annually as a result of poor maintenance and overloading created a serious cause for concern. The condition of ships in some instances gave rise to them being referred to as ‘coffin ships.'

Guide to Port Entry - innovation in print

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Guide to Port Entry IS Innovation of the Year 2013

Guide to Port Entry IS Innovation of the Year 2013

I have been meaning to blog more often and really haven't managed it. Good intentions and all that. But today I have a 'real' reason to blog so here goes. Last night at the PPA Digital Publishing Awards, our flagship publication Guide to Port Entry won the Innovation of the Year Award for 2013. Amid all the apps and websites and datafeeds of the UK digital publishing industry, a book was the most innovative entry. Sounds slightly mad, doesn't it?

But it's well deserved. The Guide has always been innovative, since our founder Colin Pielow put together the first edition from scraps of notes about ports he had been collecting. Back in 1971, no one was sure there would be a demand for a such a book, but Colin's hunch proved correct. The 2nd Edition in 1973 added port plans and in 1975, the 3rd contained detailed information about Soviet-era Russian ports, the first western publication to do so.

Port, harbour or terminal.. What's the difference?

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If you are not in the mairitime industry, you may be unaware that there are various descriptions for places where maritime vessels can dock. A port is not the same thing as a harbour or terminal.
As such, we hope to clarify these different terms for you in the information provided below.

UK Shipping Ports

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The UK economy is the seventh largest in the world and domestic UK ports play a vital role in the UK economy.  UK ports are amongst the most competitive and efficient in the world, they handle over 95% of UK imports and exports and in 2008, the value of trade through British ports was around £340 billion.  Although the global recession during 2009 and 2010 has had an impact on the amount of traffic through ports in the UK, domestic ports and shipping still make a sizeable contribution to the UK economy.

Parasitic Worms - Potential Hazards to Mariners

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Introduction

Parasitic worms - correctly called helminths - that cause diseases in humans, are not related to earthworms, in spite of the appearance of some of them. Many different species are found in various parts of the world. Mariners may therefore be at risk, not only when they go ashore but also from those that parasitise some of the animals carried as cargo or as shipboard pets.

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